Daniel Dern's scouting out CES 2009 in Las Vegas, and though the show floor doesn't open until Thursday, he's here with a report from the pre-show event, CES Unveiled which you can listen to or download as a podcast. Daniel notes that the pre-show event isn't as crowded as last year's but that there were plenty of press on hand nonetheless. Check out the podcast and stay tuned for more CES 2009 coverage as the week progresses. Issue"> TechRevu CES Unveiled
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CES Unveiled
Review by Daniel P. Dern
CEA  ISBN/ITEM#: CES2009DDDAY1
Date: 06 January 2009

Links: Daniel and Ernest's Preshow CES Podcast (mp3) / Show Official Info /


Daniel Dern's scouting out CES 2009 in Las Vegas, and though the show floor doesn't open until Thursday, he's here with a report from the pre-show event, CES Unveiled which you can listen to or download as a podcast. Daniel notes that the pre-show event isn't as crowded as last year's but that there were plenty of press on hand nonetheless. Check out the podcast and stay tuned for more CES 2009 coverage as the week progresses.

CES Unveiled is the official press preview for CES -- a large room where press who have arrived early enough in the week can start seeing some of the vendors and products, without those pesky prospective buyers getting in the way. And without the big, noisy booths -- just tables with products, literature, the odd give-away or two, and digital and/or paper press kits. (And food and drink -- the event is from 4PM to 7PM, and it's easy to let this be dinner.)

It looks like there were about 60 exhibitors -- there were also several long tables' worth of organizations and of prize-winners. And while the press crowd wasn't elbow-to-elbow in the aisles like last year, the crowding around the tables was challenging enough that I missed getting to Asus to see their new netbooks and notebooks, and to see Powermat's wireless chargers (the odds are good they'll be at the Pepcom and/or ShowStoppers events later this week).

But I did manage to slog through enough to see many; here's a few that stood out.

Probably the most important one is HyperSpace (hyperspace.com), from Phoenix Technologies is a "new instant-on and always-connected computing environment." From the press release:

- "[allows] users to instantly launch important web-based applications (before Windows even boots), automatically connect to the best available network, extend battery life, and achieve new levels of uptime and security protection. HyperSpace is immediately available for download at www.hyperspace.com"

- "by utilizing the power of virtualization technology, HyperSpace can run side-by-side with Windows Vista on certain systems, making your computer far more power efficient, secure and frustration-free."

- "HyperSpace is optimized for web applications like Google Apps and will include shortcuts to those applications so that consumers can easily access their favorite Internet sites. Phoenix Technologies is also working with Yahoo's Zimbra division on an advanced email application for HyperSpace."

"HyperSpace is a private operating system that is far more difficult to infect with viruses, rootkits and spyware than operating systems like Windows. Applications are digitally signed and stored in a secure memory store that is locked after execution. Updates and additions to HyperSpace will only be made via a site approved and owned or audited by Phoenix."

Hotcha!

(Hyperspace won't be free -- but it might be for now, go download it ASAP! That's what I'm about to go do.)

Joby joins the high-priced (over $100) Bluetooth headset gang with the Zivio Boom. It's got a retractable boom microphone, and the optional earpiece hook "clamps" on with magnets, and a sweet AC/USB charger -- two power ports, and the plug swivels in. The sound is quite good (I charged it up) on the user side; Ernest will have to tell you how it sounds from the other end.)

I won't know what it sounds like until I charge up, pair up, and try it, but it looks nifty as all get out.

For stargazers and amateur astronomers, Meade's new ETX-LS telescope, with 6" primary mirror makes it easy -- their LightSwitch tech can find stuff, including from its database or its GPS, track, capture images, tell you about what you're looking at, and more. (Will it detect dangerous alien spacecraft or collision-oriented asteroids?) At $1,299, this shouldn't be an impulse buy, but it looks like a heck of a bargain for what it has and can do.

TriSpecs new Bluetooth sunglasses include music-grade stereo headphones, a Bluetooth headset for phones, MP3 controls and phone/volume controls. And they look stylish, not dorky. Around $199.

Lenovo's newish W700 ThinkPad is workstation class, and in addition to the big main screen (16", I think), it has a slide-out second screen, like 1/4 the size of the main one, which you can even tilt in for a better view, and keep IM, calendar, email and other windows visible while working on the main application. Way cool.

And there was a lot more, some of which I didn't get to, but the show's only just begun. More to come!

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